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Tuesday, May 31
 

8:30am

Registration
Tuesday May 31, 2016 8:30am - 1:30pm
Second Floor Ballroom, Iowa Memorial Union 125 N Madison St, Iowa City, IA 52245

9:30am

Pre-Conference Workshop: Just and Effective Engagement of Communities in Teaching and Research Partnerships

Members of the University of Iowa Obermann Working Group, an interdisciplinary group of faculty/staff, are engaged in working with community partners in research/grant settings focused on immigrant families and health related issues. Our own experiences have led us to more seriously consider how community partners' roles and contributions are often overlooked in publicly engaged work related to education and research. In this pre-conference workshop, we will share results of a focus group study with our community partners. We will share strategies for more effectively communicating with community partners, building productive relationships, and actively involving community members in the collaborative process. We intend to speak to those individuals new to community engagement who seek to partner with individuals and communities.

The pre-conference workshop will be very interactive. Workshop leaders will begin with a fishbowl activity to engage attendees in the issues surrounding community partners in publicly engaged research. We share the results of our research with our own community partners and then move to small group discussion where members will discuss cases that both complicate and extend effective partnerships with community members. We close the session with strategies for effective communication, relationship building, and the ethics of campus-community collaborations.


Speakers
NB

Nick Benson

Director of Community Development and Outreach, University of Iowa
Nick Benson currently serves as the Director of Community Development and Outreach for the Provost’s Office of Outreach & Engagement and the Program Director for the Iowa Initiative for Sustainable Communities. He shapes the university's community development initiatives by... Read More →
CC

Carolyn Colvin

Associate Professor, University of Iowa
Publicly engaged scholarship, | Research in rural communities | Immigrant communities in the rural midwest


Tuesday May 31, 2016 9:30am - 11:30am
Nebraska Room 335

1:30pm

Brotherly Love: Reflections on Leadership and Community Engagement
Brothers Paul (President of Augsburg College) and Dean (Vice President for Academic Affairs at Edgewood College) reflect together on the work of making community engagement a core and integrated aspect of institutional identity and programs.  What are strategies and opportunities to lift up the work of community engagement across all areas of institutional programs?  What are the roles that leaders can play in articulating and supporting this work within an institutional and public context?

Speakers
PP

Paul Pribbenow

President of Augsburg University.
DP

Dean Pribbenow

Vice President for Academic Affairs, Edgewood College
Vice President for Academic Affairs at Edgewood College.


Tuesday May 31, 2016 1:30pm - 3:30pm
Illinois Room 348

1:30pm

Facing Stories, Strengthening Communities: The Power of Storytelling to Impact Community Change

Though the world is connected more than ever before through online platforms and social media, one-on-one connection and empathy for our neighbors is slowly disappearing. J.R. Jamison founded The Facing Project with New York Times bestselling author Kelsey Timmerman as a way to (re)connect people through stories to strengthen communities.

 

What initially started out as a project in their hometown of Muncie, Indiana, to collect the narratives of those living in poverty, The Facing Project went national – with the organization now connecting writers, storytellers, artists, educators, and community leaders in over 30 communities across the country to build community and learn from the first-person stories of their neighbors. Hailed by The Huffington Post, Harlem World Magazine, NPR, and Soul Train as one of three oral history projects to watch, The Facing Project is providing a model, tools, and a platform for communities to arm themselves with stories to begin crucial conversations on social justice issues—neighbor to neighbor, community to community—by discussing solutions and healing through their own narratives.

 Join J.R. in his Deep Dive Session as he shares the story of The Facing Project, and how the model has impacted communities and developed spin-off initiatives with homeless populations and human trafficking victims (among others). Participants will be led through a workshop on how to start a Facing Project in their communities, including how the model connects well with college student learning.


Speakers
avatar for J.R. JAMISON

J.R. JAMISON

Executive Director, Indiana Campus Compact
J.R. Jamison has spent nearly two decades connecting higher education and nonprofits through meaningful community engagement partnerships to strengthen their impact and better orchestrate their narratives as one. His rubric on embedding community engagement into campus culture has... Read More →


Tuesday May 31, 2016 1:30pm - 3:30pm
Michigan Room 351

1:30pm

From Service Learning for Students to Knowledge Mobilization for Justice
This session will challenge our thinking about higher education community engagement. The first hour of the session will have about 30 minutes of presentation and 30 minutes of discussion. In the presentation I will question the prioritization and theoretical/philosophical underpinnings of four core concepts of service learning: learning, service, community, and change. "Institutionalized service learning," the dominant form of service learning in higher education, puts student learning first, service second, community third, and change last. Furthermore, "learning" emphasizes a distorted version of experiential learning theory, "service" emphasizes a disempowering charity approach, "community" is based on an alienated exchange relationship model, and "change" is based on a neoliberal individualistic philosophy. The alternative, "liberating service learning," reverses the prioritization of the concepts, beginning with change, then community, then service, then learning. The theory of change recognizes the importance of structural conflicts in society, the theory of community emphasizes a unitary rather than exchange model, the theory of service draws from community organizing and development models, and the theory of learning works from popular education and focuses on constituencies and communities as much as students. In the second hour of the session participants will work in small groups to first brainstorm ways of implementing the "liberating" model, and briefly report back to the large group. Then they will identify knowledge, skill, and resource gaps that may prevent full implementation, again with brief report backs.

Speakers
RS

Randy Stoecker

Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Randy Stoecker has been working with small and medium-size community groups for more than 30 years, providing technical assistance, training, and research support. He’s been involved with groups across North America and Australia, though most of his experience has been in Minneapolis... Read More →


Tuesday May 31, 2016 1:30pm - 3:30pm
Penn State Room 337

1:30pm

Let's Talk about Identity in Community-based Service Learning
This workshop will encourage faculty, staff, administration, students, & community partners to explore how to engage in safe, honest, and constructive dialogue around systemic and interpersonal assumptions of identity (race/ethnicity, social class, gender/sexuality, (dis)ability, and faith/spirituality) as it relates to community-based service learning, ourselves, our campuses, and our communities. The workshop will include: an overview of structural/systemic identity formation, a discussion on identity and its impact on service learning relationships and practice, and how we can engage in reflection, as an essential act of critical service learning (Tania Mitchell 2008), to unpack and challenge normative biases. Participants will walk away with a practical framework and a set of tools for engaging in identity dialogue in service learning and everyday life. All are welcome to attend.

Speakers
JH

Jonathan Handrup

Academic & Community Coordinator, Steans Center, DePaul University
MM

Micaela Maynard

Academic & Community Coordinator, Steans Center, DePaul University
avatar for Rubén Álvarez Silva

Rubén Álvarez Silva

Assistant Director, Steans Center, DePaul University
Community-based Service Learning, Community Engagement, Faculty Engagement, Project-based Learning



Tuesday May 31, 2016 1:30pm - 3:30pm
Nebraska Room 335

1:30pm

Tools to Assess Cognitive Outcomes of Service Learning and Civic Engagement
The purpose of this session is to introduce participants to the Problem-Solving Analysis Protocol (P-SAP) and Cognitive Learning Scale, two instruments that may be used to assess outcomes of service learning and civic engagement related to problem-solving, critical thinking, and student perceptions of academic learning. Both tools are available for use at no charge; the authors simply request that those who use them share their findings in order to contribute to the ongoing development of the tools. Links to each tool and additional resources can be found at: http://departments.central.edu/psychology/faculty/psap/. The session will offer a brief background on the two tools, how and why each was developed, reliability and validity of each, scoring/coding procedures, appropriate uses for each instrument, and implications of results. Attention will also be given to how each tool could be used for further program development and improvement on the participants' campuses.

Speakers
PF

Peggy Fitch

VP for Student Development & Professor of Psycholo, Central College



Tuesday May 31, 2016 1:30pm - 3:30pm
Indiana Room 346

4:00pm

But Is It Just? A Model to Evaluate the Justice Orientation of Community-Academic Research Partnerships
As at many institutions, some faculty at the University of Wisconsin--Eau Claire (UWEC) are partnering with community agencies to perform research to meet those agencies' data needs. Such community-based research can be an important component of an institution's civic engagement effort. Commentators such as Randy Stoecker and Harry Boyte have noted, however, that academics can function as technocrats when their epistemic power perpetuates oppressive power structures; they call for deliberate attention to establishing partnership conditions that empower equitable collaboration in determining research goals and methods and analyzing data, equitable ownership and access to those data, and reciprocal benefit to both academic and community partners. In this presentation, we'll 1) share a "research justice" model we have devised intended to be used to evaluate the justice orientation of community-based research partnerships at our institution and 2) communicate the results of our effort to use this model to rate a pilot set of community-based research projects at UWEC. Attendees of this mini session will be asked to comment upon and potentially help refine the justice research model we have devised and invited to use it to evaluate their own civically engaged research and to spark discussions regarding the justice orientation of community-based research at their institutions.

Speakers
RC

Ruth Cronje

Professor, University of Wisconsin--Eau Claire
AF

Allison Fouks

Student, University of Wisconsin- Eau Claire
DT

Deborah Thompson

Student, University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire



Tuesday May 31, 2016 4:00pm - 4:15pm
Nebraska Room 335

4:00pm

Engagement in the Curriculum: Tippie RISE
As part of an effort to integrate hands-on learning into the undergraduate experience, the Tippie College of Business has adopted an experiential learning graduation requirement. All students must complete at least one of the following experiences: (R)esearch with faculty, (I)nternship, (S)tudy abroad, (E)xperiential course. Experiential courses, as we define them, closely adhere to what the literature would call high impact service-learning or community-based courses. This session will describe our efforts to credential and support these courses. 

Speakers
avatar for Colleen Opal

Colleen Opal

Assistant Director, Experiential Learning, Tippie College of Business, University of Iowa
I work in the Tippie Undergraduate Program Office as an academic advisor and the coordinator of the College's experiential learning initiatives like Tippie RISE.



Tuesday May 31, 2016 4:00pm - 4:15pm
Penn State Room 337

4:00pm

Faculty Development Reconsidered: Designing an Experiential Global Service-Learning Community and Travel Seminar
Drake University developed a faculty and staff learning community and travel seminar to help instructors learn the best practices of global service-learning. In this session we will describe the program, discuss preliminary results from participant data and brainstorm how you can implement a similar program on your own campus.

Speakers
MR

Maria Rohach

Global Learning Coordinator, Drake University
avatar for Renee Sedlacek

Renee Sedlacek

Director of Community Engaged Learning, Drake University
I've spent my entire career supporting the development of service-learning and co-curricular service programs at small private liberal arts institutions. Prior to joining the Drake staff I served seven years as the Service-Learning Coordinator at Wartburg College and one year as an... Read More →



Tuesday May 31, 2016 4:00pm - 4:15pm
Indiana Room 346

4:00pm

Not Another After School Club!
After reading the graphic novel MARCH Vol.1, Marie and Aracely presented in the classrooms to connect concepts from the graphic novel to current issues in Chicago, specifically the East Rogers Park Neighborhood on the north side of the city. This is a diverse neighborhood with a rich history that unfortunately deals with larger issues including: poverty, access to healthy food, intercultural relationships, and violence. After presenting to students on two occasions about problems plaguing the Chicago community it became apparent that there was a need for a space for students to dive into these issues. The agenda for this presentation includes an explanation of the goals and objectives of the Peace Leaders after-school club. There will also be an overview of the framework with which the club was started, and what lead to the formation of the club's structure and activities. Insights and reflections gained from implementation will also be elaborated during the presentation. We will address challenges that have arisen since starting the club such as teacher and parent involvement and recruitment.


Tuesday May 31, 2016 4:00pm - 4:15pm
Illinois Room 348

4:00pm

Taking Volunteering to the Next Level: Co-curricular Service Learning Programs Fostering a Community for Low-Income and First-Generation Students
Studies have shown that first-generation and low- income students often struggle with the transition to college. Further, many students would like to participate in community engagement activities, but doing so may reduce their ability to earn a much needed income. To assist students in overcoming these obstacles, the Office of Student Engagement & Experiential Learning (OSEEL) at Northern Illinois University collaborates with a number of campus and community partners to offer two paid, co-curricular service-learning programs, Huskie Service Scholars (HSS) and NIU Service Leaders (NIUSL. These programs provide students with the opportunity to make a difference on campus or in the community, grow their academic, social, civic, and professional skills, and create a support network of peers and staff. Further, the financial support offered allows students to earn income while giving back. This session will present the strategies used while implementing programs for first-generation and low income students, the similarities and important differences between the two programs, and the learning and personal outcomes that students experience.

Speakers
avatar for Michaela Holtz

Michaela Holtz

Associate Director and Coordinator for Community Engagement, NIU Office of Student Engagement & Experiential Learning
avatar for Katlyn Luebke

Katlyn Luebke

Office Worker, NIU Office of Student Engagement & Experiential Learning



Tuesday May 31, 2016 4:00pm - 4:15pm
Michigan Room 351

4:00pm

The Un-Conference Session
We're flipping the traditional conference session and trying something new. Join us for a facilitated session where the participants can determine the topics and build deeper relationships with other attendees. Suggested topics will include:
  • Obtaining buy-in from different types of students
  • Where does service-learning occur (on campus and in the community)?
  • Critical service-learning
  • Measuring outcomes through reflection
Attendees can also come with and propose other topics of interest to them and will have the chance to share their challenges, ideas, strategies and resources.

Speakers
avatar for Ken Brown

Ken Brown

Associate Dean Undergraduate Program in Business, Tippie College of Business/University of Iowa


Tuesday May 31, 2016 4:00pm - 5:15pm
Lucas Dodge Room 256

4:30pm

Community-based Service Learning Placements: Smooth Sailing or Controlled Chaos
Community-based Service Learning (CbSL) placements can make or break a community partner relationship and lead to an excellent, or mediocre, student experience. Learn about the DePaul University's Irwin W. Steans Center for Community-Based Service Learning & Community Service Studies' placement process and help us to explore other models in an effort to refine and deepen the work of civic engagement.

Speakers
avatar for Rubén Álvarez Silva

Rubén Álvarez Silva

Assistant Director, Steans Center, DePaul University
Community-based Service Learning, Community Engagement, Faculty Engagement, Project-based Learning


Tuesday May 31, 2016 4:30pm - 4:45pm
Nebraska Room 335

4:30pm

Cross Discipline Collaboration: Working Together to Create Something New
Cross discipline collaboration in higher education is scarce, and often unheard of. Gannon University's School of Education is proving this idea wrong. "Crayons for Kids" is a project that has developed to meet a number of needs. Through the collection of something as simple as unused and broken crayons, faculty from the Education and Engineering departments at Gannon are collaborating to create a brand new innovative piece of assistive technology that will serve the students attending a private school for children with special needs in Erie, PA. Come and learn about how "Crayons for Kids" is changing the way faculty collaborate, innovate, and serve their local community!

Speakers
avatar for Nancy Morris

Nancy Morris

Instructor, Gannon University
I currently teach early childhood and special education at the undergraduate and graduate levels at Gannon University. I am a former elementary special education teacher. I am passionate about connecting my students to meaningful service learning opportunities to help them be more... Read More →


Tuesday May 31, 2016 4:30pm - 4:45pm
Penn State Room 337

4:30pm

One Community, 100 Books
A work in progress, One Community, 100 Books aims to capitalize on the spirit of social justice inspired by this semester's theme by encouraging students, faculty, and community members to record a short book talk about a favorite book and how it relates to an issue of social justice relevant to our community. A digital archive of the book talk collection will be linked to the UI Libraries catalog. Mini-session attendees can view a selection of videos created by UI librarians and university students who were the first to record book talks for the project. Recommendations will be provided for developing similar programs in other communities. Attendees are also invited to create their own submissions for One Community, 100 Books!

Speakers
AA

Alonso Avila

Librarian, University of Iowa
Alonso Avila is a librarian at the University of Iowa Libraries and is a graduate from the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research focuses on international hip-hop and special collections.
KL

Kathrina Litchfield

Programs Coordinator, UI Center for Human Rights


Tuesday May 31, 2016 4:30pm - 4:45pm
Indiana Room 346

4:30pm

Using Collective Efforts to Assess Needs Among Underserved Populations
A cohort of Iowa Campus Compact VISTAs in Dubuque serve with four organizations, focused on assisting under-resourced individuals to improve their quality of life and thrive in the community. One of the four organizations, Project Concern, houses the 211 Information and Referral hotline, which provides an ongoing opportunity to gather and analyze the unmet needs of underserved populations in the community. In collective efforts this information can be shared to influence policies and projects within the community to better meet needs of vulnerable populations and increase quality of life, while empowering individuals to thrive in their community. This approach supports the systems change theory which will guide future work for the cohort and their collective efforts.

Speakers
MB

Maggie Baker

Service Learning Coordinator, Loras College
KS

Katherine Sipple

AmeriCorps VISTA, Operation: New View CAA



Tuesday May 31, 2016 4:30pm - 4:45pm
Illinois Room 348

5:00pm

Citizen-Scholar: Honors Students and Community Partnerships
Honors education has recently shifted to focus on the notion of the "citizen-scholar," to challenge students to apply their academic achievement outside of the classroom for greater impact. The Loras College Honors program intentionally links academic research with community-based learning, through a three year project. Students work in interdisciplinary teams with a faculty mentor to address a problem in a community, and work with community partners to develop solutions. The program is in its third year and students have secured sustainability grants, worked with youth on issues ranging from mental health to maker-space technology, promoted STEM education and veterans' initiatives, and studied microfinance in developing countries. In the sophomore year, students choose a topic or problem of study and begin a process of discernment through macro level and micro level research, community outreach, cultural competency training, and regular reflection and public presentation of progress. The project lasts six semesters, culminating in the spring of their senior year. Throughout the program, students learn to direct problem solving based on inquiry, experiential learning, and reflection. We currently have 14 projects running, with five new projects beginning each year. This session covers the way we deliver our Honors curriculum, examples of personal and professional development for students, and community impact and effects. In addition, brief case studies of projects will be shared, as well as strategies for retention and faculty involvement.

Speakers
EV

Erin VanLaningham

Associate Professor of English/Director of Honors, Loras College
Honors Programs, Community Partnerships, Food


Tuesday May 31, 2016 5:00pm - 5:15pm
Penn State Room 337

5:00pm

History Corps@UIOWA: Project Centered Learning
How can humanistic departments train their students to engage with the public and with social justice? How does collaborative project driven work enrich graduate scholarship in the humanities? Our panel presents a model for history graduate education that provide means of addressing these questions. The University of Iowa's History Corps is a graduate student-led public humanities and digital humanities working group that provides its members with training in primary source research, publicly engaged scholarship, and collaborative project development and education. This working group breaks the real and imagined barriers that can separate scholar from scholar and scholar from the public by approaching scholastic training from the perspective of collaboration and service-learning,. In this presentation, three History Corps members will highlight the key features of our project-centered model and share their own civically informed scholarship. The goal of this presentation is to stress the advantages of collaboratively-centered, project-based scholarship for graduate students in the humanities.

Speakers
DD

David De La Torre

PhD Student, University of Iowa


Tuesday May 31, 2016 5:00pm - 5:15pm
Nebraska Room 335

5:00pm

Pizza and Policy: Engaging Students in Political Discussion
Students increasingly desire civic engagement with their collegiate experience according to research done through the Higher Education Research Institute. These students, however, may lack the objective information about issues that they want to engage with. Pizza and Policy is a new event series run by undergraduate fellows at Simpson College's Culver Public Policy Center. At these events, an in house expert, undergraduate or faculty, gives a half hour, scholarly presentation on a hot topic policy issue with time for discussion afterwards. The Center provides pizza and beverages to facilitate a relaxed, attractive atmosphere. This event series aims to increase informed political discussion around issues that students care about. Success will be monitored over the semester through surveys, student interviews, and social media monitoring. During this presentation, steps to replicate this program will be shown as well as an evaluation and overview of the Pizza and Policy events hosted during the 2016 spring semester.


Tuesday May 31, 2016 5:00pm - 5:15pm
Indiana Room 346

5:00pm

The Call for Collaboration between Nursing and Social Work Students
Qualitative research service learning project was carried out at a community partner site in the 2015 school year in order to collect data on the experience of the participating nursing and social work students. Students from nursing and social work disciplines where involved in planning, enacting and evaluating the impact of of this interdepartmental approach. Additionally data was collected related to the participating community partners clienteles' perceived health care needs. During the presentation the results of the students' and community partners clienteles' experiences and perceptions will be discussed via power point and lecture. The power point and lecture will be delivered by a representative of the community partner, nursing student, and nursing faculty.

Speakers
TB

Tanya Blonn

Director of Restoration Ministries, Restoration Ministries
KS

Kathryn Stefo

Assistant Professor of Nursing, Trinity Christian College



Tuesday May 31, 2016 5:00pm - 5:15pm
Illinois Room 348

5:00pm

Ugetconnected Volunteer Website
La Crosse, WI is united in service. Our local service finder and tracking website is a collaboration between Great Rivers United Way, UW-La Crosse, Western Technical College and Viterbo. This session will discuss the value of collaboration and agency networking.www.ugetconnected.org 

Speakers
KR

Kari Reyburn

Community Engagement Coordinator, Western Technical College
avatar for Jaralee Richter

Jaralee Richter

Assistant Director, University Centers, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
Leadership and Engagement. Campus Activities, Mentoring Graduate Students, Cross Campus Collaboration


Tuesday May 31, 2016 5:00pm - 5:15pm
Michigan Room 351

5:15pm

Social Hour
Tuesday May 31, 2016 5:15pm - 6:00pm
Second Floor Ballroom, Iowa Memorial Union 125 N Madison St, Iowa City, IA 52245

6:00pm

Dinner and Keynote with Zach Wahls
Zach Wahls is a graduate of the University of Iowa, an advocate for LGBTQ rights, an Eagle Scout, and co-founder of Scouts for Equality, the national campaign to end discrimination in the Boy Scouts of America. His testimony about love and family before the Iowa House Judiciary Committee was YouTube's most-watched political video of 2011. He is a Truman Scholar and the author of the national bestseller book My Two Moms: Lessons of Love, Strength and What Makes a Family. He has been a featured guest on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, The Late Show with David Letterman, The Ellen Show, and Newshour. He currently lives in Iowa City, Iowa.

Speakers
avatar for Zach Wahls

Zach Wahls

Zach Wahls is a graduate of the University of Iowa, an advocate for LGBTQ rights, an Eagle Scout, and co-founder of Scouts for Equality, the national campaign to end discrimination in the Boy Scouts of America. His testimony about love and family before the Iowa House Judiciary Committee... Read More →



Tuesday May 31, 2016 6:00pm - 7:30pm
Second Floor Ballroom, Iowa Memorial Union 125 N Madison St, Iowa City, IA 52245

8:00pm

Post-Conference Humanities and Public Life Reception and Book Signing
You're Invited!

The Obermann Center for Advanced Studies and the University of Iowa Press invite you to a cash bar reception and book signing to celebrate the new book series, Humanities and Public Life. The series documents the work of scholars and community partners dedicated to the theme of the 2016 Upper Midwest Civic Engagement conference-"Beyond Service: Education, Research, and Work for a Just World."

What?      Cash Bar Reception and Book Signing
When?     Tuesday, March 31, 2016 from 8:00-9:30 pm (short program at 8:30 pm)
Where?    Times Club-upstairs in Prairie Lights Bookstore
Why?       Enjoy colleagues and celebrate the new Humanities and Public Life Book Series!

Featured Author and Book:

Anne Basting, Professor, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; Founder, The Creative Trust; and Artist
Co-editor with Maureen Towey and Ellie Rose

The Penelope Project: An Arts-Based Odyssey to Change Elder Care

 At Milwaukee's Luther Manor, artists and scholars from the University of Wisconsin and Sojourn Theatre Company, students, staff, and residents traded bingo cards for copies of The Odyssey. Their two-year collaboration profoundly reimagines this ancient myth. What if the real hero is Penelope, who never left home? To answer, they staged a play that transcended the limits of old age and disability, but also of youth, institutional constraints, and disciplines. Readers of The Penelope Project sends become part of an ambitious quest for long-term care community that engages its residents in challenging, meaningful art-making.

Anne Basting focuses her teaching and creative research on community-engaged performance. She is the author of three books, including Forget Memory: Creating better lives for people with dementia (2009), and dozens of articles. Her TimeSlips Creative Storytelling project is used in health care and retirement settings across the country.

Learn more about Anne Basting's work (and to see a trailer of a documentary film about The Penelope Project).

Learn more about the Humanities and Public Life Series.

Learn more about the University of Iowa Obermann Center for Advanced Studies.

Speakers
AB

Anne Basting

Professor, UWM
avatar for Teresa Mangum

Teresa Mangum

Professor of Gender, Women’s, and Sexuality Studies and English and Director of the Obermann Center for Advanced Studies, University of Iowa
Teresa Mangum is Professor of Gender, Women’s, and Sexuality Studies and English and Director of the Obermann Center for Advanced Studies at the University of Iowa. She is fascinated by past Victorian animals and future careers for humanities PHDs, as part of a Mellon Humanities... Read More →


Tuesday May 31, 2016 8:00pm - 9:30pm
Prairie Lights Bookstore (Times Club Upstairs) 15 S Dubuque St, Iowa City, IA 52240
 
Wednesday, June 1
 

8:00am

Registration and Breakfast
Wednesday June 1, 2016 8:00am - 8:30am
Second Floor Ballroom, Iowa Memorial Union 125 N Madison St, Iowa City, IA 52245

8:30am

Engagement Through Academic Internships: Another Opportunity Gap
Metropolitan State University is Minnesota's public urban institution of higher education, with a strong commitment to anti-racism, equity, and an "unwavering commitment" to civic and community engagement. Internships, as community engagement experiences, are increasingly recognized as crucial to the development of skills, abilities and insights contributing to students' personal and professional development. With its reported 38% students of color and American Indians, a recent examination of internship participation at Metro State revealed another instance of a significant opportunity gap. Similar data are also found at other institutions and in published research. Presenters will overview this data and provide a framework for participatory discussion of the issues associated with this loss of opportunity for this population.

Speakers
VC

Victor Cole

Community Engagement Coordinator, Metropolitan State University, Institute for Community Engagement and Scholarshi
DK

Doug Kowlton

Associate Provost for Student Success, Metropolitan State University


Wednesday June 1, 2016 8:30am - 9:30am
Illinois Room 348

8:30am

Engaging Stakeholders: Who's Around Your Table?
In this session participants will learn about building relationships in communities in order to maximize quality of engagement. A team of faculty and staff will share real successes and real challenges in their community engagement work, drawing on a project that brought interior design students from campus to provide technical assistance to Anglo and Latino retailers in Storm Lake, Iowa. Engagement work raises fundamental questions about who is at the proverbial community table. It can be difficult to identify stakeholders beyond the usual suspects of community leaders. Understanding community demographics prior to engagement work can assist in recognizing critical absences from the list of stakeholders. It is also important to revisit and revise who is included as a stakeholder as projects develop. This session will provide strategies to look beyond traditional partners for engagement work. Emphasis will be placed on consistency, relationship building, and follow-through to make student engagement worthwhile to the host community.

Speakers
LB

Lisa Bates

Extension Specialist, Iowa State University
SE

Susan Erickson

Interior Design Specialist, Iowa State University
JW

Jon Wolseth

Field Specialist, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach


Wednesday June 1, 2016 8:30am - 9:30am
Nebraska Room 335

8:30am

Communicating for Effective Capacity-Building Service Learning Partnerships
Many examples of effective service-learning involve direct service to community partners. In addition to that support, our community partners report that their work is enriched and expanded by volunteers who can provide consultative or skill-specific service. These capacity-building service learning partnerships (especially those that are project based) present unique challenges to staff, faculty, community partners, and students. In this session, presenters show how effective communication can address these challenges. The presenters will discuss communication between faculty and staff, faculty/staff and community partners, faculty/staff and students, and students and community partners. A model that incorporates community listening, semester-long commitment, and faculty involvement will be described.

Speakers
LL

Linda Laine

Associate Professor of Communication Studies, Central College
JK

Jessica Klyn de Novelo

Associate Director, Center for Community-Based Lea, Central College



Wednesday June 1, 2016 8:30am - 9:30am
Penn State Room 337

8:30am

Everyday Life as Civic Engagement: Expanding the Scope and Leverage of Experiential Learning
Where does civic engagement happen? This session shifts students' everyday interactions to the forefront of civic experiential learning. Students' ongoing involvements-in the classroom, in campus and community life, and on social media-constitute their most direct, sustained experiences of power and social recognition. However, students typically have few tools for realizing the consequentiality of these experiences or situating them within broader patterns of social inequality. More often, they are skilled at naturalizing the mechanisms of social dominance, making them invisible even to themselves. This session outlines an intrinsic pedagogy of civic experiential learning, which integrates the experiential emphasis of Dewey and Freire with insights from race, gender, and micro-sociological theory. This approach trains students directly from their social relations, revealing how power and social recognition are simultaneously pervasive and naturalized, in order to instill habits of reflexive social conduct. This approach is distinct from, but in constructive tension with more traditional forms of service-learning, which introduce students to the civic sector, but do little to interrogate students' day-to-day lives. Together, the two strategies offer a more expansive, relevant approach to civic experiential learning. Drawing upon recent courses, the presenter illustrates how instructors can strategically problematize students' ongoing experiences and introduce students to unfamiliar civic settings. Participants will discuss challenges of translating current best-practices, such as reciprocity and accountability, into the fluid context of students' everyday interactions. Participants will also have opportunities to sketch and discuss applications of this approach for their own purposes.

Speakers
CH

Chris Hausmann

Assistant Professor of Sociology, Northwestern College


Wednesday June 1, 2016 8:30am - 9:30am
Indiana Room 346

8:30am

Teasing Out Some Complexity in the Understanding of Ourselves
We want to students to become critical thinkers and civically engaged, treating others fairly and working for social justice. They are given theoretical examples and case studies, but are they given the tools to relate these admirable goals to their own experiences and daily practices? An empathy for the other can be found in a better understanding of the self; knowing that one is encountering the world through lenses, filters, perceptions and circumstances just as any Other. Participants will be invited to partake in exercises that can be the beginning of a catalog of exercises that can help students encounter self, others, and the world in ways that are dynamic, complex, nuanced and responsive.

Speakers
PM

Patrick Muller

Coordinator, Test Center, Kirkwood Community College


Wednesday June 1, 2016 8:30am - 9:30am
Michigan Room 351

9:45am

Competencies of Second Generation Community Engagement Professionals: Findings from the Campus Compact CEP Project
This session will present findings of a literature review and corresponding study that examined competencies of Community Engagement Professionals (CEPs). CEPs are professional staff whose primary job is to support and administrate community-university engagement. Given the dearth of empirical literature on CEPs in higher education, the team of researchers drew from abundant literature on community-university engagement practices to infer competencies. Researchers then compiled the identified competencies into a ranking tool that was administered to CEPs at professional association meetings. Results include a preliminary competency model for second generation CEPs.

Speakers
AF

Ashley Farmer-Hanson

Assistant Dean for Student Life & Director of Civi, Buena Vista University
avatar for Kira Pasquesi

Kira Pasquesi

Doctoral Candidate, University of Iowa
Kira Pasquesi is a doctoral candidate in the Higher Education & Student Affairs program at the University of Iowa. Her dissertation is examining how colleges and universities use language to represent diversity and inclusion in community engagement.



Wednesday June 1, 2016 9:45am - 10:45am
Indiana Room 346

9:45am

Improvisational Storytelling to Transform Care
Students carry society's negative attitudes toward aging and disability. With our aging population, we need to create meaningful, engaging service-learning programs that turn our denial and negative stereotypes inside out. This session shares a model in place for 4 years at UWM, the TimeSlips improvisational storytelling approach with people with dementia.

Speakers
AB

Anne Basting

Professor, UWM
NG

Nicole Glaser

Director of Community-Based Learning, UW-Milwaukee Center for Community-Based Learning, Leadership, and Research


Wednesday June 1, 2016 9:45am - 10:45am
Illinois Room 348

9:45am

The Higher Education Dilemma: To Produce Career Professionals or Engaged Citizens?
Institutions of higher education aim to prepare students for successful professional careers. Success if often measure by job placement upon graduation which reinforces the training of students for a job. Some argue that higher education should be more focused on developing engaged, active citizens.

Bok's (2006) developed a framework that outlines eight components that higher education should be developing in students to they can be productive citizens. This session will review the outcomes and impacts of student development of these eight competencies through participation in student organizations. The primary purpose of this research was to analyze the impact of student involvement in student organizations on students’ development of core competencies during their experience at the Midwest university. Data was collected through surveys from 6 semesters of graduating students. This presentation will focus on the analysis conducted to determine if students in student organizations develop these competencies differently than students not involved in student organizations. This presentation will also discuss if there is a difference in development based on gender, job, service vs. non-service organizations, leaders vs. members, a student’s self-reported level of engagement, the number of semesters involved and the number of student organizations a student is involved in during their university experience.

Following the presentation, participants will engage in a discussion on how student organizations can be facilitated to deepen student impact and better prepare students to be engaged, global employees and citizens. 

Speakers
JG

Julianne Gassman

Associate Professor, University of Northern Iowa



Wednesday June 1, 2016 9:45am - 10:45am
Penn State Room 337

9:45am

Community Writers Draft Stories inside a Homeless Shelter: An Iowa Public Writing Arts Project
In the world "as it is," deficits dominate narratives of homelessness, associating poverty with lower literacy skills and skewing social policies about access and equity in schools, jobs, healthcare, and community. These pervasive cultural discourses work to immobilize individuals and families, leaving them without access to education and resources that could facilitate their reengagement with the community. Yet if our role in the academy is to advocate for change, disrupt social apathy, and organize ourselves toward a just world, then we must commit ourselves to public engagements that open access to literacy spaces and opportunities-that invite, for instance, community members whom we marginalize to enact identities of strengths rather than lack. In this presentation I discuss the Community Stories Writing Workshop (CSWW), a writing group I founded at the local homeless shelter and the Veterans Affairs in 2010. Premised on the principles of public engagement that recognize the necessity for, and the power of, mutually beneficial collaborations between the university and the community, the workshop serves as a literary and scholarly space where community writers of diverse backgrounds (e.g., homeless) co-construct literacy practices/meaning/stories through writing-art forms. Through their weekly participation, they challenge deficit discourses prescribed to them and of them, informing, if not changing, what we in the academy assume about writing and writers, reading and readers, and what literacies we privilege, and whose. To this end, attendees of this session can expect the following: 1) an overview of the CSWW; 2) a public reading by community writers from the CSWW; 3) critical conversations about our roles and responsibilities in bridging literacies between the academy and the community.

Speakers
RZ

Rossina Zamora Liu

Clinical Assistant Professor/Faculty Fellow, The University of Iowa


Wednesday June 1, 2016 9:45am - 10:45am
Nebraska Room 335

9:45am

Leveraging the Prism Effect of Service Learning in Community Colleges

Learn what two national-level researchers discovered during a decade of assessing service learning outcomes for 3,274 students at 26 community colleges in 18 states. Like a prism that breaks a beam of light into multiple colors, one semester’s service learning experience concurrently affects students’ academic learning, civic engagement, retention, interpersonal skills, critical thinking, workforce skills, leadership development, and community impact. With the prism effect in mind, one of the researchers will share an evaluation of community college responses to Campus Compact’s 2014 national membership survey. A review of the survey results suggested most prism outcomes are addressed in colleges’ strategic plans, yet practitioners often fail to use that fact to leverage more institutional support for their programs. Participants will learn how to use the prism effect of service learning as a means for viewing student and programmatic outcomes and gaining administrators’ support.

 


Speakers
avatar for Gail Robinson

Gail Robinson

Education Consultant, Gail Robinson Consulting
Gail Robinson is a Maryland-based education consultant who works with college and university faculty, staff, and administrators to develop service learning and community engagement programs. She has authored numerous publications and serves as an advisor, trainer, and consultant to... Read More →



Wednesday June 1, 2016 9:45am - 10:45am
Michigan Room 351

11:00am

Conscious Community Engagement & Contemporary Racial Justice Movements
It has long been the expectation that institutions of higher education should lead the way in creating a more just world. We are currently experiencing a time of activism and organizing in which under-served communities are being clear about what they need and desire from those in power. In maintaining a place as institutions that promote the greater good, it's important to be aware of what these needs are so that community engagement can be tailored to be sensitive to and be aware of those needs and desires as well as how social injustice may be affecting members of our own campus communities.

Speakers
avatar for Shawnteal Peery

Shawnteal Peery

AmeriCorps VISTA, Illinois Campus Compact



Wednesday June 1, 2016 11:00am - 12:00pm
Illinois Room 348

11:00am

Preparing Students Professionally While Engaging Them Civically

The purpose of this session is to advance conversations around Experiential Learning (service learning, civic engagement, internships, etc.) and the increased priority of professional development. Institutions of higher education are facing increased pressure to simultaneously graduate employable students, critical thinkers, and engaged citizens. Those who work in community engagement inherently see the professional and personal development students experience and their increased sense of citizenship and leadership, but how can we more effectively collaborate with our career planning peers and administrators to align our goals? The presenters of this interactive session represent a variety of institutional types and have wrestled with this question from a diversity of perspectives and campus reporting structures.  This breakout session will foster dialogue with attendees about their work in this area, best practices that have been developed, and other relevant elements of this important conversation – e.g,  the history of higher education and how it’s goals ebb and flow with national community and economic challenges.  Through the mutual sharing of resources and best practices, we hope that this can serve as a collaborative time for all session participants to learn from each other on how to combat the siloed perception of community engagement for the good of the field and of our students.

 


Speakers
KL

Kayla Lyftogt

Director of Community Engagement, Coe College
avatar for Judy Lykins

Judy Lykins

Director of Service Learning, Century College
I'm the Director of Service Learning at a suburban community and technical college near St Paul. I enjoy connecting students with needs in the community; recent interest and focus is collaborating with Career Services to help students see the continuum from service to career.
GS

Gina Sevick

Director of Community and Work-Based Learning, Inver Hills Community College
avatar for Katie Wilson

Katie Wilson

Director for Civic Engagement, Cornell College
Master's in Higher Ed., I am currently finishing up my first year at Cornell. Specific research interests include creating and maintaining effective community partnerships, best models for assessment, and practical ways to implement critical service learning.


Wednesday June 1, 2016 11:00am - 12:00pm
Penn State Room 337

11:00am

Building Mutually Beneficial Partnerships: It's Complicated
As engagement work goes beyond one-day service projects to deeper, more meaningful work, relationships become complicated. "Mutually beneficial partnerships" are frequently cited as a best practice. This presentation looks critically at what it means to develop mutually beneficial partnerships at the college or university level. Who should be involved, and how, and when? Presenters from two state universities will share their institutions' different models of engagement, citing the advantages and disadvantages of each. The role of staff, faculty, students, and the larger university will be examined at various stages of the partnership. Session attendees will have the opportunity to examine their own models of engagement, consider what is working well, and discuss how positive changes might occur. In this session we will consider an engagement continuum that ranges from technical assistance to complex community change, examine our places along the continuum, and examine the hypothesis that students may be the best agents of change for community development work in which we are involved. Crafting partnerships carefully may be a crucial ingredient in paving the way for students to act in ways that encourage positive change in community development.

Speakers
NB

Nick Benson

Director of Community Development and Outreach, University of Iowa
Nick Benson currently serves as the Director of Community Development and Outreach for the Provost’s Office of Outreach & Engagement and the Program Director for the Iowa Initiative for Sustainable Communities. He shapes the university's community development initiatives by... Read More →
SE

Susan Erickson

Interior Design Specialist, Iowa State University


Wednesday June 1, 2016 11:00am - 12:00pm
Indiana Room 346

11:00am

Intersections: Online Instruction for a Just World
Rural Iowa is getting left behind in the search for a just world. This presentation will focus on how innovative community-connected projects in online course curricula can reach across geographic boundaries to both positively influence student learning outcomes while also creating social change in rural Iowa communities through nonprofit capacity building efforts. The online course Nonprofit Organizational Effectiveness will be used to illustrate how a meaningful community engagement project can propel students to dive into the research, 'go beyond service,' and learn how to effectively engage as active citizens in their own communities through the power of online instruction. This presentation will offer methods of leveraging institutional resources to support the successful implementation of a community engagement project in an online course context, increase student-community partner interactions, and provide the means towards social changes in rural Iowa communities.

Speakers
JS

Jill Smith

M&O Lecturer, The University of Iowa


Wednesday June 1, 2016 11:00am - 12:00pm
Nebraska Room 335

11:00am

Marketing for Involvement - Promoting Service to Engage Students
Utilizing existing infrastructure on campus and in the community, this presentation focuses on the processes of creating a marketing survey, marketing plan, and how to map the best places on your campus for promoting to students. Participants will walk away with a detailed and customized marketing plan for their campuses based on samples and template from which they can work.

Speakers
avatar for Madeline Carrera

Madeline Carrera

Service Learning Coordinator, Gateway Technical College
Madeline has over 6 years experience in Service Learning and facilitation of Service Learning methodology, curriculum development, and promotion in Higher Education. As the Service Learning Coordinator at Gateway Technical College, she is responsible for establishing and maintaining... Read More →


Wednesday June 1, 2016 11:00am - 12:00pm
Michigan Room 351

12:00pm

Lunch and Keynote with Dr. Georgina Dodge
Dr. Georgina Dodge  is the University of Iowa’s Chief Diversity Officer and Associate Vice President, as well as the university’s Title IX Coordinator. She has a Ph.D. in English from UCLA and is an adjunct Associate Professor of English with scholarly interests in multi-racial literatures, autobiography, and cultural studies. She serves on the national Board of Directors for the Association of Title IX Administrators as well as the boards of the ACLU of Iowa, the United Way of Johnson & Washington Counties, the Iowa Network for Women in Higher Education, and Humanities Iowa. Prior to her academic career, she served a six-year enlistment in the Navy, working as an electronics technician on communications, radar and meteorological equipment.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Georgina Dodge

Dr. Georgina Dodge

Dr. Georgina Dodge is the University of Iowa’s Chief Diversity Officer and Associate Vice President, as well as the university’s Title IX Coordinator. She has a Ph.D. in English from UCLA and is an adjunct Associate Professor of English with scholarly interests in multi-racial... Read More →



Wednesday June 1, 2016 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Second Floor Ballroom, Iowa Memorial Union 125 N Madison St, Iowa City, IA 52245